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Mystery orbits in outermost reaches of solar system not caused by ‘Planet Nine’

This is an artist’s impression of a Kuiper Belt things, situated on the external rim of our planetary system. Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI). The weird orbits of some things in the limits of our planetary system, hypothesised by some astronomers to be formed by an unidentified ninth world, can rather be described by the combined gravitational force of little things orbiting the Sun beyond Neptune, state scientists. The alternative description to the so-called ‘World 9’ hypothesis, advanced by scientists at the University of Cambridge and...

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Waves in Saturn’s rings give precise measurement of planet’s rotation rate

This picture of Saturn’s rings was taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on Sept. 13,2017 It is amongst the last images Cassini returned to Earth. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute. Saturn’s unique rings were observed in extraordinary information by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, and researchers have actually now utilized those observations to penetrate the interior of the huge world and acquire the very first exact decision of its rotation rate. The length of a day on Saturn, according to their computations, is 10 hours 33 minutes and...

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Saturn hasn’t always had rings: 2017 Cassini flyby allows first accurate estimate of weight and age of Saturn’s rings

Artist’& rsquo; s idea of the Cassini orbiter crossing Saturn’& rsquo; s sound aircraft. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech image. Among the last acts of NASA’s Cassini spacecraft prior to its death plunge into Saturn’s hydrogen and helium environment was to coast in between the world and its rings and let them pull it around, basically functioning as a gravity probe. Accurate measurements of Cassini’s last trajectory have actually now enabled researchers to make the very first precise price quote of the quantity of product in the world’s...

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Scientists find increase in asteroid impacts on ancient Earth by studying the Moon

Image illustrates the modification in effect rate designed in this paper. A few of the craters utilized in the research study on both the moon and Earth are highlighted in the background. Credit: Information from NASA GSFC/ LRO/ Arizona State University; Art Work by Rebecca Ghent. A global group of researchers is challenging our understanding of a part of Earth’s history by taking a look at the Moon, the most total and available chronicle of the asteroid accidents that sculpted our planetary system. In a research study released today in Science, the group reveals...

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Evidence of changing seasons, rain on Saturn’s moon Titan’s north pole

New research study offers proof of rains on the north pole of Titan, the biggest of Saturn’& rsquo; s moons, revealed here. The rains would be the very first sign of the start of a summertime season in the moon’& rsquo; s northern hemisphere, according to the scientists. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona. An image from the global Cassini spacecraft offers proof of rains on the north pole of Titan, the biggest of Saturn’s moons. The rains would be the very first sign of the start of a summertime season in the moon’s northern hemisphere. ”...

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Nature’s magnifying glass reveals unexpected intermediate mass exoplanets: Microlensing reveals sub-Saturn giant planets are common, not rare

World OGLE-2012- BLG-0950 Pound was found through gravitational microlensing, a phenomenon that functions as nature’s magnifying glass. Credit: LCO/D. BENNETT. Astronomers have actually discovered a brand-new exoplanet that might modify the standing theory of world development. With a mass that’s in between that of Neptune and Saturn, and its place beyond the “snow line” of its host star, an alien world of this scale was expected to be uncommon. Aparna Bhattacharya, a postdoctoral scientist from the University of Maryland and NASA’s Goddard...

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TESS discovers its third new planet, with longest orbit yet: Measurements indicate a dense, gaseous, ‘sub-Neptune’ world, three times the size of Earth

NASA’& rsquo; s TESS objective, which will survey the whole sky over the next 2 years, has actually currently found 3 brand-new exoplanets around close-by stars. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Area Flight Center, modified by MIT News. NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Study Satellite, TESS, has actually found a 3rd little world outside our planetary system, researchers revealed today at the yearly American Astronomical Society conference in Seattle. The brand-new world, called HD 21749 b, orbits a brilliant, close-by dwarf star about 53 light years away,...

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New Ultima Thule discoveries from NASA’s New Horizons

The New Horizons science group produced the very first stereo image set of Ultima Thule. This image can be seen with stereo glasses to expose the Kuiper Belt item’s three-dimensional shape. The images that produced the stereo set were taken by the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 4: 23 and 5: 01 Universal Time on January 1, 2019 from particular series of 38,000 miles (61,000 kilometers) and 17,000 miles (28,000 kilometers), with particular initial scales of 1017 feet (310 meters) and 459 feet (140 meters) per pixel. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI. Information...

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NASA’s New Horizons mission reveals entirely new kind of world: Images of the Kuiper Belt object Ultima Thule unveil the very first stages of solar system’s history

This image taken by the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) is the most in-depth of Ultima Thule returned up until now by the New Horizons spacecraft. It was taken at 5: 01 Universal Time on January 1, 2019, simply 30 minutes prior to closest method from a variety of 18,000 miles (28,000 kilometers), with an initial scale of 730 feet (140 meters) per pixel. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Study Institute. Researchers from NASA’s New Horizons objective launched the very first in-depth pictures of the most...

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Juno mission captures images of volcanic plumes on Jupiter’s moon Io: Light from the plumes and fires of Io on Earth’s darkest night

Juno’s Radiation Tracking Examination gathered this picture of Jupiter’s moon Io with Juno’s Excellent Recommendation System (SRU) star cam quickly after Io was eclipsed by Jupiter at 12: 40: 29 (UTC) Dec. 21,2018 Io is gently brightened by moonlight from another of Jupiter’s moons, Europa. The brightest function on Io is presumed to be a permeating radiation signature. The radiance of activity from numerous of Io’s volcanoes is seen, consisting of a plume circled around in the image. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI. A group of area researchers...

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